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(step-by-step tutorial pictures coming soon!)
 
  
 EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming

For Electroforming with a Water Based Conductive Paint


(If you purchased a Kit at the Bay Area Maker Faire 2018 - Click here for the acetone based paint tutorial)
(If you purchased a Kit at the San Diego Maker Faire 2018 - Click here for the alcohol based paint tutorial)

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Step 1 - Design & Prep
Step 1b - Preparing Organics

Step 2 - Gluing

Step 3 - Sealing

Step 4 - Conductive Painting

Step 5 - Electroforming
Step 5b - Clean Up

Step 6 - Polishing, Patinas & Finishes

Step 7 - Preventing Oxidation

Tips & General Guidelines

Health & Safety Information

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:: Step 1 - Design & Prep ::

Materials needed in this step:

  • Piece(s) you want to electroform
  • Embellishing elements
  • Sketchbook and pencil

When coming up with design ideas, it can help to sketch out what you want the finished piece to look like. Sketching out future designs can also help you get your ambitiously creative ideas all out on the page while you learn and develop your craft.
Start with something simple while you are still learning how to electroform.

Popular design mediums are made from crystals, gemstones, leaves, acorns, pine cones, feathers, bone, glass, sculpted clay, metal findings, laser cut or 3-d printed plastic, and of course a mixed media of all these items and more.



:: Step 1b - Preparing Organics::

You will need to fully dry or press dry any organic material that still has moisture. This prevents the object from wilting during the prep stages, and also prevents inner rotting of the finished piece.

- The easiest way to dry multiple batches of leaves is to press dry them in old books, weighted down with something heavy, if not with more books on top. Typically they are dry by day three, but it’s best to leave it for at least a week. A very low setting flat iron can help speed up this drying process. Keep in mind that even though leaves are flattened and prepped dry with a thin shape- they will regain some natural aesthetic again once they go through steps 3 and 4.

- Some objects that you are plating immediately can be sealed in fresh, especially if you need to retain its natural form shape- such as a full flower or a mushroom. To preserve a 3 dimensional object, you can soak your object in a mix of 1 part water to 1 part vegetable glycerin in a cup or jar of water for a few days to a week. You can also experiment with coating your piece in resin to retain its shape(and also acts as a sealant, so you could skip step 3!)


- For fresh acorns, pinecones, wood, etc, bake them on a flat pan or baking sheet on a low temperature(175 - 200 degrees) for about two hours, or until all moisture has been evaporated. Glue the acorn cap on, as you will find they will pop off easily after they bake.



:: Step 2 - Gluing ::

Materials needed in this step:

  • Object(s) to electroform
  • Your choice of glue
  • Jump rings or another creative form to make a loop
  • Pliers to manipulate the jump ring
  • Spring clips or alligator clips to prop your piece up while drying
  • Ruler or measuring tape


Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming

Once you get your design together, you’ll need to attach something to your piece so that your suspension wire can hook onto while in the electroforming solution, as well as onto your necklace when your piece is finished.

- The glue e6000 is highly recommend when working with preparing pieces to be electroformed. The mini tubes are prefered, as the larger ones tend to dry out less than halfway through the tube.

- e6000 will start to get tacky in about 2 minutes after it’s been exposed to oxygen, and it will start to set after about 10 minutes.

- Super glue will also work, although e6000 is much easier to work with and gives a stronger, more stable bond. Tip: When using super glue, sprinkle a little baking soda to instantly dry the glue. Always be in a well ventilated area when using any of these types of glue.

- Use a jump ring, formed wire, a charm/pendant that has a loop on it, a fold over bail, formed clay, or anything else creative you can think of as a connection to attach to your piece.
Keep in mind that electroforming will thicken this connector with copper, so take that into account when designing this part. For example, if you attach a jump ring with too small of a diameter but a necklace chain can still pass through after gluing it, you may find that after it has been electroformed, it may thicken too much for the chain to thread through.

After you are satisfied with your design, let the glue cure at least 6 hours, or overnight before continuing to the sealant and/or conductive painting stage.


- At some point, you’ll need to calculate the square inch of the surface area to be electroformed on your piece. This will come into use during the actual electroforming stage later on. Keep in mind all sides of the piece. Here is a handy square inch calculator to bookmark:

  
You’ll be setting your amps at:  .01 amps x sq inch of surface area.
Make note of this for stage 5/Electroforming.


:: Step 3 - Sealing ::


Materials needed in this step:


Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming

If your design is anything organic such as leaves, flowers, pine cones, acorns, feathers, insect specimens, seeds, etc, they will need to be sealed with a lacquer or sealant. Any organic items that are porous such as honeycomb, shell, wood, bone, etc, will also need to be sealed so that they will retain their shape during the plating process, and so they don’t get dyed blue in the electroforming solution! Sealing in all organic pieces will prevent any contamination in your conductive paint, and also in your electroforming solution.
Basically if your design is not full glass, plastic, or metal, then you must seal it!

- Polyurethane is a great sealant to use. It comes in a liquid or a spray form. You can also use Modge Podge, resin, or even clear nail polish(only when using a water based conductive paint- NOT with an acetone based conductive paint!!).

- You can use a combination of small spring clamps and alligator clips to hold up the piece while painting by clamping onto the loop or any part of the piece that isn’t going to be sealed.

- If painting on, use brush and water down if necessary by periodically dipping your brush in water between dipping in the sealant. Make thin, even strokes, keeping in mind that any texture will show up in the finished electroformed surface. Allow to fully dry if you are doing more than one coats (two is recommended). Use an opened large paper clip to hook one end to your piece, unclamp any alligator or spring clips, and hook the other end of the paper clip to the drying rack(jewelry displays work great as a drying rack). Make sure you have a tray, a matt, or a protective sheeting under the drying rack, as there may be drippings while the piece it drying.

- If dipping, hook an opened paper clip to the loop of your piece and use the other end as a handle to dip your piece directly into the bucket of sealant. Hang on the drying rack and catch any excess sealant that builds up at the bottom or edges of the piece. You’ll have keep an eye on it for a while to catch a lot of excess dripping by using this method, but you’ll get a smooth and uniform coverage(no brush strokes), and will only need to do the coating once.

- If spraying, hold your piece upright on a combination of alligator clips and spring clamps, spray from about 9 to 12 inches away to ensure an even coat. Let dry, and apply a second coat. Use an opened paper clip to hang dry on the rack.


- If your design has gemstones, you should seal them before plating, as the electroforming solution will destroy most gemstones. Anything under a 7 on the mohs hardness level definitely needs to be sealed. If it’s 7 and over(for example, a quartz), it usually don’t have to be sealed, but it’s always better to be safe than to ruin your piece- or even your electroforming solution.
To seal them, you can either use a water based polyurethane, such as polycrylic or modge podge(which you can peel off later), a liquid masking frisket(used by artists for masking painting areas- dries milky yellow and you can peel it off later), or clear nail polish(which doesn’t peel off, and you should NEVER put acetone/nail polish remover directly on your gemstones to try and remove it later). You can put clear nail polish on top of the polyurethane layer if you wish.


- If your item is all metal to begin with(which is called electroplating!), or has a mixed media, including metal, then you may not need to seal/paint the metal parts. Copper, Silver, Titanium are all fine. If they have some kind of pre coating or sealant on it, then it is no longer conductive, and needs to be painted to be made conductive again. If the metal type is questionable, then you should always seal it and paint it with conductive paint, otherwise it could contaminate your paint and your electroforming solution, which creates issues during plating.


It is incredibly important to let the sealant completely dry before you move on to the next stage. 24 hours is best.
Without a full cure time, you’ll find that painting conductive paint over a layer of sealant that isn’t fully cured will result in a surface texture of a thousand little bubbles or bumps that resemble frog skin. If you make that mistake, you will see that the texture will slightly go down after the conductive paint dries, however you will see see some of this texture when your piece is electroformed.


:: Step 4 - Conductive Painting ::

Materials needed in this step:

  • Water Based Conductive Paint
  • Small glass container
  • Distilled Water (found at most stores for $1) for thinning paint and as a brush cleaner
  • Small spring clips and/or alligator clips 
  • Gloves
  • Paint brush 
  • Paper/Shop towel for blotting excess paint from your brush
  • Opened large paper clips (turned into an S hook shape)
  • Drying rack
  • A tray, a matt, or plastic sheeting to protect your workspace from paint drips
  • Wide mouth jar with an airtight plastic lid (for creating a dipping container, or a thinned consistency paint that is separate from your original paint)

Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming


In this last prep stage, you will make your design conductive by coating with your conductive paint, which can be used to dip or paint on. Always keep your conductive paint well sealed when not in use. You can add a thin layer of distilled water(NOT tap! Or filtered! Minerals in non distilled water can contaminate your paint, as well as your electroforming solution) in your jar to help it from drying out. Mix and shake well before each use.


- Wherever the paint is applied is where the copper will be in the finished result. It can cover the whole piece, or just portions of it. If you paint just a portion, just make sure each end touches another part that is conductive, as the electric current will need a path to flow through.


- Be sure to wear gloves, or to not directly touch the surface of your piece, as skin oils or dirt and residue will create unplated spots while your piece is electroforming. You can always touch up and repaint surfaces as you see this- but it’s always better if you have avoid having to do so.


- Just as in the sealing step, use any spring clips and alligator clips to help hold up your piece hands free, if needed.


- Apply 1 to 2 thin coats of your conductive paint. You can thin your paint with distilled water to help with fluidity and to reduce and brush strokes and any unwanted texture.


- Keep a separate glass jar of distilled water to occasionally dip your brush into between paint coatings, as to also use to clean your brush with.


- If dipping, add some paint into separate wide mouth container (make sure it has an air tight lid that is preferably made of an acetone resistant plastic)and thin it down a little bit with distilled water. Shake well. Hook an opened paper clip to the loop of your piece and use the other end as a handle to dip your piece directly into the your container of conductive paint. Hang on the drying rack and catch any excess paint that may build up at the bottom or edges of the piece. You’ll have keep an eye on it to catch any excess dripping by using this method, but you’ll get a smooth and uniform coverage(no brush strokes). After it fully dries, dip once more if needed and hang dry.


Allow your paint to fully dry before applying any additional coats. Although the conductive paint may seem to dry quickly, its best to let it cure with more drying time. Wait at least 3 - 4 hours, or even overnight, before you begin electroforming.



:: Step 5 - Electroforming ::


Materials needed in this step:


Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming


- Select a flat workspace to set up your electroforming station. Place the lipped tray down and put your beaker inside. Plug in your power supply to a grounded outlet(make sure it’s switched off), and set nearby the beaker, on the outside of the tray. Plug in the lead wires to the correct marked red and black plugs. Turn the amp knob all the way to the left (off) and volt knob all the way to right (on).


- Uncurl your copper coil and make the top end of the wire stick out over the edge of the beaker. Make sure the coil is clean before putting it inside the beaker. The coil should last you through several electroforming jobs, depending on the size and thickness needed.


- You can use pretty much anything for a bar that goes across the top of the beaker/container/tank that you’ll hook your cathode/suspension wire/piece on, as its purpose is just to hold up your cathode up from dropping into your electroforming solution. A wooden bar is included in your kit. To prevent the bar from rolling, use a small spring clamp on each end of the wooden bar and clamp it to the lip of the beaker.
If you prefer to use a metal bus bar, you can cut a piece of 8 gauge copper wire. This method is useful if you plan to hang multiple pieces off it, as the entire bar is conductive. You can either hammer flat both ends of the metal bus bar wire.


- Once you have your station all set up, you can now get your piece ready to start the electroforming process. Cut a piece of your thin gauge wire to loop around your bus wire and then using your pliers create a “s” hook the other end of the wire onto your prepared piece(aka cathode). It should be long enough to fully submerge into the solution, but not too long that it will touch the bottom of your beaker. Remember to wear gloves when handling your painted piece, otherwise you may experience conductive resistant spots due to skin oils from your fingers.


- Wearing your safety glasses, gently poor your copper sulfate/sulfuric acid electroforming solution into your beaker with the copper coil inside. If the temperature is below 65 degrees fahrenheit, then you’ll need to keep your solution warmer by setting the beaker on top of a heating pad(on low! Don’t melt the beaker!) to prevent issues due to cold temperatures during electroforming.
Attach your red lead wire to the end of the copper coil that is sticking out of the beaker. Attach the black lead wire to the wrapped over suspension wire on your suspension bar, which is not submerged into the solution. Switch on the power supply, make sure the numbers are all set to 0 (amp knob all the way to the left/off, volt knob right/on), and then carefully by holding your suspension bar, submerge your suspended piece into the solution, so that it is evenly placed in the center. Make sure that your suspension wire and piece doesn't touch the anode/coil wire. If you are using a metal bus bar as your suspension bar, make sure that it also doesn't touch the top of the coil either. If this accidently happens, you’ll notice there will be no plating happening! If you don’t have a bus bar with hammered ends, then use a spring clamp on both ends of the bus bar to prevent it from rolling.

- Slowly turn the amp knob to the right until your numbers begin to move up to the calculated amps per square inch of surface area to plate(get the number you calculated in Step 2/Gluing). Too high will “burn” your piece, turning it brown and flakey, or give you bumps and other unwanted texture. So when in doubt, lower amps are better. You’ll start to slowly see the copper form on your piece, starting from contact points from your suspension wire. Gently giggle the wire if you notice any air bubbles on your piece, as they will prevent plating from happening on those spots if not removed. Make note of the time and write it down on the side of your beaker using the dry erase maker.


- You may notice the amp number drop a bit while the first layer of copper is covering the surface of your piece. This is normal, as the total surface area is increasing as the copper is spreading over the areas that are conductive. So keep an eye on it, and keep slowly increasing the knob to keep it at the correct number.

Depending on the size of your piece, and your desired thickness, this part can take several hours. Keep an eye on it every hour or so, making sure that the texture is where you want it, and that there are no bare patches that didn’t plate. If this happens, switch off the power supply, pull it out, rise it off in distilled water, pat dry or use a blowdryer to get all all the moisture out and then repaint with your conductive paint on the spots with that are not plating. Let the paint fully dry before submerging into the plating solution again.

You’ll likely notice that your newly copper formed areas will look pink, salmon colored, and possibly matte. DON’T WORRY! This will happen about 95% of the time, as opposed to coming out bright, shiny, and highly polished. It will shine to perfection with a few simple tools once you are finished and happy with the thickness of your plating.



- Once you're happy with the thickness of copper deposit on your piece, turn off your power supply, unhook the black lead wire, and remove your piece from the suspension bar. Rinse it off by dipping and swirling it around in a container of distilled water. You can run it through tap water, but only if you don’t plan on putting it back into the the tank again(minerals in tap water can contaminate the plating solution). Don’t leave any water spots, as it can discolor the copper as it dries. If its happens, it can easily be cleaned off.


:: Step 5b - Clean Up ::

Materials needed in this step:


Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming

If you aren’t planning on electroforming any other pieces that day, you’ll want to filter and store your solution back into solution again to prevent evaporation and deterioration of your copper coil.


- Place a filter inside your funnel and place it inside your empty electroforming solution bottle. Wearing your safety glasses, carefully and slowly pour your solution into the bottle through the filter lined funnel. It is normal for copper particles to be at the bottom of the beaker, creating a purple color as it mixes in with the solution. You can let it settle and separate, or you can just filter as much as you can and discard the heavy mix at the bottom. Top off your solution with distilled water if the liquid level is significantly less than when you started. Place the cap back on, and store until you're ready to use it again.


- Thoroughly rinse out your beaker and coil. You can use tap water to clean it, but just be sure to give it a final rinse off in distilled water and fully dry it with a shop towel to ensure there is no residue left from the tap water. To be environmentally responsible, be sure to heavily dilute any reminats in your beaker down to a clear liquid before allowing anything to drain down the sink.


- Your coil is likely dulled down in color and looks dingy. After fully rinsing, completely dry it off and then use a brass brush or steel wool to shine it back to its original state. Store it away until you're ready to use it again. An 8 gauge coil should last you through many pieces of small/average size. You will notice it will get thinner after use.

- Clean off any residue or buildup that is on your lead wire clips. A brass brush usually does the trick. Keeping these clean will ensure a good connection when you're electroforming.


- If you don’t plan on using any patina solution to darken/oxidize your design, you can remove any masking or frisket that you may have used to seal in your gemstones for protection from the electroforming solution. It should peel up when scratched at.



:: Step 6 - Polishing, Patinas & Finishes ::


Materials needed in this step:


Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming

It's quite easy to turn that flat salmony colored copper that you’ve likely pulled out of the tank into a shiny penny colored copper.

- Take your choice of polishing tool: a brass brush, steel wool, or a dremel with a wire brush wheel attachment.
Use safely protection such as a face mask, safety glasses, and disposable gloves during the polish process, as the these particles can be painful to breathe in or get into your eyes.

A tumbler (like a rock polisher) with a polishing medium can also be used to polish large batches of items at once. Use a little water and a drop of soap as a lubricate when tumbling.


After you’ve finished polishing to your desired shine, you can either leave it in this color, which will be a raw copper or rose gold looking finish. You’ll need to seal it in(seen in step 7) to preserve this color and prevent natural oxidation.


- There are several ways to create patinas and colored finishes on your design. Liver of sulfur(waaay stinky, but effective and fast!) creates a dark “antiqued” or oxidized look, that can have highlights that are polished and shiny. Liver of sulfur comes in gel form, or in powder form- both mix with hot water. Playing around with varying hot water temperatures can give really pretty blue or rainbow tones to your copper.


- Alcohol ink can easily be used to dye your metal any color you wish. Mixing it with with a sealant such as polyurethane or clear nail polish helps to seal in the dye without making it run.



:: Step 7 - Preventing Oxidation::


Materials needed in this step:


Supply list with Amazon links: EnchantedLeaves.com/Electroforming

If you wish to keep your copper design from naturally oxidizing and tarnishing, you can use some sealants to either slow the process, or prevent it from happening all together. Natural oxidation can come from being exposed to natural elements, oils and sweat from skin, as well as perfumes, lotions, bug sprays, sunscreen, etc. It also causes the “green mark” on the skin, as the copper can get wet, patina, and then rub onto the skin.

- Polyurethane is the easiest sealant, which is included in your kit. It can be applied with a paintbrush with the liquid paint form, or spray it on using the spray can type. Protectaclear is also a wet medium that works very well as a sealant. Clear nail polish is also widely used, especially for the inside of copper rings.
If needed, spring clips can help you to hold the piece without touching it while painting. For these wet mediums, you’ll want to set up a protective tray and drying rack down to hang your design on while it dries.


- Another simple and popular sealant product is Renaissance Wax. This is particularly good to use if you don't want the design to have any glossy shine or a slick surface. Work in a well ventilated area and use disposable gloves and a soft rag or shop towel to buff the wax into the copper. It dries almost right away, but you’ll need to set it aside until the strong smell dissipates.



:: Tips & General Guidelines ::

Electroforming takes some trial, error, tweaking, and a lot of patience! Here are some helpful notes that I've learned over the years

  • Over time, your solution's electrolytes will become depleted. You can then use a new solution, or replenish with acid, brighteners, and distilled water to restore the pH balance
  • If your piece is lightweight, you may experience some frustrating floating with your piece and wire. You can experiment with other techniques of floating prevention such as suspending a heavier non conductive object at the bottom of your piece(such as a piece of glass or crystal), or creating a sort of “cage” that slightly spirals around your piece that prevents the bottom of it floating up to the surface
  • If your power supply has the option of constant current- keep it switched on
  • A safe setting is .1 amp per square inch of your piece to be plated (length x height x .1)
  • When in doubt, "Low and Slow" is the way to go
  • Air bubbles are unwanted! If you see any air bubbles on your piece(from air that was trapped in crevices during initial submersion into the plating tank), gently jiggle your wire until you see all the bubbles shake off. You might want to switch off your power supply, in case jiggling tampers with the connection. Failure to do so during the beginning will cause pockets of unplated spots, as it does not plate under the bubbles
  • Once you've had a better feel for plating, try to increase your amps in the first hour to help get a faster initial coat, then turn it back down. Leaving it on high for too long can "burn" your piece and make your plating too coarse or brittle. It is helpful to use this method for the first coat, since prolonged exposure to the solution can dissolve the conductive painted parts if they aren't plated fast enough
  • Titanium wire helps prevent floating of lightweight pieces in your plating tank, and is also is less prone to fusing the suspension wire to the piece
  • The more contact points from your suspension wire to your piece, the faster initial plating coverage. This should be experimented with only after you have become more comfortable with electroforming
  • Always use distilled water when cleaning your brushes, tank, etc, to prevent contamination

  • Yes, you can plate multiple pieces at once. You'll need to make sure they are all connected on the same wire, or at least all on an conductive bus bar, and you'll have to increase your amps accordingly(.1 amp per square inch). Only attempt after you're more confident in your plating practice
  • You can incorporate aggregation (fish bubbler) to your tank set up if you are having issues with striations or unwanted patterned textures due to proximity of anode/cathode
  • SAFETY FIRST! Always wear gloves, goggles, and a mask when needed, and work in a well ventilated area when handling materials with fumes
  • To create a lacy or filigree look to your leaves, you will need to boil them in baking soda to remove the fleshy pulp on them and reveal the skeleton structure. Its best to do this when the leaves are picked fresh.
    • Bake ¾ of a cup of baking soda at 300 degrees for about a half hour(this turns it into washing soda/sodium carbonate)
    • Boil 2 cups of water in a large pan, add your washing soda, stir
    • Bring the boil down to a simmer and add your leaves. Let them simmer for about 1.5 hours, adding any extra water as needed
    • Strain and gently rinse with water
    • Next, you’ll use a paint brush and clean water to gently remove the pulp of the leaf, revealing the veins. You may need to do this to both sides, depending on the leaf.
    • Blot with a paper towel and flatten in a book to fully dry

:: Health & Safety Information ::

Copper Electroforming Solution

Met. Corr.1 H290 May be corrosive to metals
Acute Tox. 4 H302 Harmful if swallowed
Skin Irrit. 2 H315 Causes skin irritation
Eye Dam. 1 H318 Causes serious eye damage

  • Keep only in original container
  • Do not eat, drink or smoke when using this product
  • If in eyes: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present and easy to do. Continue rinsing
  • Immediately call a POISON CENTER/doctor
  • IF ON SKIN: Wash with plenty of water
  • If skin irritation occurs: Get medical advice/attention
  • IF SWALLOWED: Call a POISON CENTER/doctor if you feel unwell. Rinse mouth
  • Absorb spillage to prevent material damage
  • Store in corrosive resistant container with a resistant inner liner
  • Wear protective gloves/protective clothing/eye protection
  • Contaminated work clothing should not be allowed out of the workplace
  • Wash hands thoroughly after handling
  • Avoid release to the environment
  • IF exposed or concerned: Get medical advice/attention
  • In case of fire: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, chemical foam, or water spray to extinguish
  • IF ON SKIN (or hair): Take off immediately all contaminated clothing and wash it before reuse. Wash with plenty of water
  • If skin irritation or rash occurs: Get medical advice/attention
  • IF INHALED: Remove person to fresh air and keep comfortable for breathing
  • Call a POISON CENTER/doctor if you feel unwell


Conductive Paint


H225: Highly flammable liquid and vapor
H372: Causes damages to organs (lungs, central nervous system, inner ear) through prolonged or repeated exposure by inhalation
H319: Causes serious eye irritation
H315: Causes skin irritation
H317: May cause allergic skin reaction
H336: May cause drowsiness and dizziness

  • Keep out of reach of children
  • Keep away from heat, hot surfaces, sparks, flames, and other ignition sources. No Smoking
  • Keep container tightly closed
  • Do not breathe mist/vapors/spray
  • Use only outdoors or in a well-ventilated area
  • Do not eat, drink or smoke when using this product
  • Use explosion-proof electrical/ventilating/lighting equipment
  • Wear protective gloves/protective clothing/eye protection
  • Contaminated work clothing should not be allowed out of the workplace
  • Wash hands thoroughly after handling
  • Avoid release to the environment
  • IF exposed or concerned: Get medical advice/attention
  • In case of fire: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, chemical foam, or water spray to extinguish
  • IF ON SKIN (or hair): Take off immediately all contaminated clothing and wash it before reuse. Wash with plenty of water
  • If skin irritation or rash occurs: Get medical advice/attention
  • IF INHALED: Remove person to fresh air and keep comfortable for breathing
  • Call a POISON CENTER/doctor if you feel unwell

Polyurethane Lacquer

H372: Causes damages to organs (lungs, central nervous system, inner ear) through prolonged or repeated exposure by inhalation
H319: Causes serious eye irritation
H315: Causes skin irritation
H317: May cause allergic skin reaction
H336: May cause drowsiness and dizziness

  • Wear protective gloves
  • Wear eye or face protection
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Wash hands thoroughly after handling
  • Keep container tightly closed
  • Do not breathe mist/vapors/spray
  • Store locked up
  • IF ON SKIN (or hair): Take off immediately all contaminated clothing and wash it before reuse. Wash with plenty of water
  • If skin irritation or rash occurs: Get medical advice/attention
  • IF INHALED: Remove person to fresh air and keep comfortable for breathing
  • Call a POISON CENTER/doctor if you feel unwell

 

 

 

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